Harmonic Minor Scale, & Natural and Melodic Minor Scale and Piano Chords Chart for the 12 Minor Keys

Harmonic minor scale, plus natural and melodic minor scale, FREE download. Print out one-octave and two-octave scales, I, IV and V chords, tonic chord inversions and arpeggios, all on one sheet for each of the 12 minor keys! 


Harmonic minor scales and chords sheet


Download free minor scales and piano chords chart Key of Am 

Download free music scales and chords for Bb minor 

Download printable scales and chords for B minor 

Download scale and piano chords chart for C minor 

Download music scales and chords for key of C# minor 

Scales and chords for key of D minor 

Piano arpeggios, scales and chords for Eb minor 

Download scales and chords for key of E minor 

Chord inversions, argeggios, and scales for key of F minor 

Download free piano scales and chords for key of F# minor 

Download arpeggios, chords, and scales for G minor 

Download printable piano scales and chords for G# minor 

Here are the enharmonic minor keys: 

Download enharmonic chart Key of Ab minor 

Download enharmonic chart Key of A# minor 

Download enharmonic chart Key of D# minor 

As a child, I always loved the minor keys the most. I guess I still do. Of all the scales, the harmonic minor scale was my favorite, because it seemed to contain magic within its sounds... magic that could carry me away to other lands in my imagination.

Classic Piano Songs Instrumental

My students started to really enjoy their scales, chord inversions and arpeggios when we made a contest out of the process... a contest between them and the metronome. It gives them a goal, a measurable mark of progress. They can feel the skill of their hands growing.

When they get fast enough with arpeggios that we leave the one-tic-per-note behind (when 208 is not fast enough) and we need to do three notes for each tic of the metronome, that can be intimidating or even irritating. Matching the metronome can be a struggle for some kids. But here's a fun approach:

Say you're doing an Am arpeggio... break it up into segments. Start hands separate, even if they can easily do hands together arpeggios. Set the metronome for 60 or so (about 3 times the speed of 200, or a little less).

Listen to the metronome go "Tic -- Tic -- Tic" while you say "1-2-3, 1-2-3, 1-2-3," each "1" coordinated with a tic, waiting to "jump" in like a child jumping rope. Then jump in, playing just one octave, making the A's match the metronome. "A-c-e-A!" (Tic-2-3, Tic-2-3) "A-2-3-A!" Then try two octaves. Then backwards.

Doing the arpeggios in "chunks" like this will give them another practice technique for their "toolbag".

Below is an interesting Youtube video which seeks to explain the difference between regular natural minor, and the harmonic minor scale:


I hope you find the harmonic minor scale and other piano scales and chords useful in your music studio. While understanding the method of building them is what's most important, it is also helpful for students to know what they look like. For you as a teacher, sheets like these save time and expedite assignment-making. 




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