Piano Keyboard Diagrams
to Print Out

Piano keyboards, printable and FREE, in three different styles for music teachers. Let your piano and guitar students fill in the blank piano keys themselves, perhaps using the new lettered keyboard as a reference.

My newest printable piano keyboard shows the piano keys with the note names on them, white keys and black keys too!



piano keyboard with note names


Download paper keyboard with key names 

If you choose to print out this particular piano keyboard for your students (or yourself), I suggest laminating it! Ink is so expensive, and we music teachers seem to need a lot of it.

You might also find it useful to laminate one of the blank sets of keys below, and allow your students to write on the keyboard with an erasable felt pen, to use the keyboard over and over.

I use "blank" paper keyboards with all my beginner piano and guitar students. I used to assign kids the entire paper to fill in the first week, but gradually I've come to assign just one note name per week ("This week, I want you to write in all the D's, in pencil"), so that we keep returning to the piano key chart week after week.

Below are two very different piano keyboards diagrams: the first one has small keys (uses less ink!), the second one is larger, with fewer keys. Both print out nicely on 8 1/2" by 11" paper, with plenty of white space left for you to write on!

piano keys 4 octaves


Download 4 octaves of blank piano keyboard 

My students get to know the key names based on an idea from www.tcwresources.com -- the 3 black keys are "Grandma's house," and the 2 black keys are "the dog's house."

G = Grandma

A = Ants that are hiding in Grandma's house -- probably Carpenter ants! Or it could be "A" for Auntie.

B = the Back door

C = the Cat

D = the Dog

E = the Eagle, or the Elephant

F = the Front Door

For the first few months of their lessons, they must fill in the piano keyboard paper one key-name per week. The first week they write in all the D's, and the piano players practice a hand exercise to go with it.

This exercise, known as "Dipping Donuts," requires shaping the 1 and 3 fingers into a round hole like a donut, then pretending to "dip" it into an imaginary glass of milk, using a smooth wrist action.

Don't be in too much of a hurry to rush through key recognition

So, all week long at home, they start their piano practice time by "Dipping Donuts" on all the D's. First one hand, then the other, strikes each D on the piano, from left to right, then back down again right to left (or the other way around -- some free spirit always wants to do it backwards, and it really doesn't matter!).

Make a technical exercise out of it, for fun

This reinforces not just the piano key's location and name, but also a flexible wrist motion. (This idea comes from FJH's My First Piano Adventure, Lesson Book A Pre-Reading, which is full of cute and effective ideas for beginners.) I frequently have to remind them not to stiff-handedly "splash" the donut into the milk, but gracefully bend the wrist. Over a period of weeks (and months of follow-up), it starts to become natural!

Keyboard recognition is important for all musicians

It's obvious why piano players need to start learning the names of the keys, but why guitarists? They, too, need to understand the topography of the piano keyboard, on which there seem to be black notes "missing" between B and C, and E and F.

3-octave piano keyboard


Download printable piano keyboard with 3 octaves 

Using a keyboard sheet with guitar players

When I give blank piano keys sheets to guitar beginners, the first thing we do is learn where the guitar strings are located on the piano. We highlight those, and use them as a reference for learning how to tune to a piano.

First the open strings, then the frets

Next, we learn all the names of the other keys. Then, we use the blank keyboard sheet as a reference for saying note names as they play scales fret-by-fret from string to string. ("Open E, F, F#, G, G#...Open A, A#, etc.")

Make these sheets last -- they use a lot of ink

I suggest you print out just one at first to see how you like the size. The black keys use a lot of ink, and so these paper keyboards are precious commodities once they are printed out! I don't pass out new ones. If a student rips the holes so the keyboard sheet doesn't stay in their 3-ring binder, then I mend the edge with wide tape folded over, and punch new holes!

Music education? Music resources?

A plain paper blank piano keyboard sheet is one of the best all-around tools a music teacher has! 



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Real Size Keyboard  Not rated yet
In the attached file I am providing the real dimensions of a piano keyboard. It's captured from Synthesia. If you need high resolution and lossless image …

Basic Foundation Not rated yet
I also agree but it is not only intended for students 6-13 years old. It is also the basic foundation of Music. If you can memorize thoroughly these keys …

Age level? Not rated yet
What age are these "lessons" intended for? Because it only took me a week to memorize the keys. Reply from Dana I agree that most students …

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Debbie, Nashville, TN:
I have been looking for a very, very long time for a website like this! WOW! I have been teaching for over 20 years and it's nice to have a resource such as this!

Perfect Start for Notereading

Ashley:
Thank you so so much for this site! I'm teaching my little sister and everything up here is absolutely amazing! I will definitely be making a donation as soon as possible! Thank you again! You're wonderful!

trios for piano


Stasi:

AH!!!!! I am so happy to find a helpful site like this. I started to give piano lessons to one little girl from church and two girls requested voice lessons this spring. Since then, word got out and going into the fall I have 18 students. I am so excited, but I'm running out of materials that they can borrow, and I, like you hate telling the parents to buy more books. Because I have such a diverse group of students I spend SO much time making supplemental material and I feel like I have to pick through other websites, to only find one or two useful things. I am so thankful for the wealth of supplement that you have offered here! And it's all SO user friendly!! THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU!!!!


Carrie,Voice and Piano Teacher:
This site is FABULOUS. For all the reasons you explain on the site itself--this is exactly what piano teachers need! (I still need to go look at the vocal music). Wow. THANK YOU SO MUCH!

Organ book for beginners

Kim in Washington:
My son is hooked...I've been introducing piano to my son on and off for a year or so, but he's not had much interest. Then I gave him"Monsters Everywhere". He loved playing it with the organ sound on our piano. He memorized it that week and I'm printing off the other Halloween songs to keep him going. I love the detailed instructions on teaching since he is my first student! Thanks so much.
Dana:
That is so neat that your son has experienced the magic and mystery of music through this little song. That is so exciting to me. Thanks for writing, Kim!


Sheet Music Purchase or Download Instrumental

Joy:
Thank you. Just wanted to say I found your website by mistake but what a blessing it has been. I am a missionary wife living in Spain (for many, many years) and I teach piano to Spanish children and adults. I have the barrier of very few usable things in Spanish, and can so identify with the need to write things suitable for the student...

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